Toyota F engine

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The Toyota F series gasoline engine was first introduced in 1955. They have become known for their high amount of torque at low RPM and their massive cast iron blocks and heads. These 6-cylinder engines boast the longest production history of any Toyota engine. The F engines all incorporate overhead valves actuated by pushrods from a gear driven camshaft in the lower portion of the engine. The engine was first introduced in the Land Cruiser, and in many countries, was the only engines offered in the Landcruiser until 1993. Although it's commonly badged as the Land Cruiser engine, it was used in a variety of other large truck applications as well, such as in fire trucks and the Toyota FQ-15 trucks. It was also used in the Crown based Japanese Police Patrol Cars FH26 and FS20-FS50.

Engine Revisions

F

F
ManufacturerToyota
TypeInline-6
Production1955-1974
PredecessorB
SuccessorF (1974)aka F.5
Bore90 mm
Stroke102 mm
Displacement3.9 L (3878 cc)
Fuel systemCarbureted
Fuel typeGasoline/Petrol
Power output75/93 kW (105/125 hp)
Torque output261/289 N·m (189/209 ft·lb)
Compression ratio6.8/1

The F engine is a 3.9 liter, 75/93 kW (105/125 hp), carburated gasoline engine that is capable of 261/289 N·m (189/209 ft·lbf) of torque at 2000 RPM; the difference in power and torque is different depending on the export destination. The original design was started in the early 1950s when Toyota had begun to export their vehicles internationally.

The F engine is said to be based on the Chevy 235 inline-6 because much of the world was familiar with the design. The general idea was consumers would feel comfortable with the engine since it was a familiar design and had a proven track record. Some of the bottom end of the engine is rumored to be interchangeable with these Chevrolet engines.

The F engine replaced the early 3.4 liter B gasoline engine introduced in 1937 (not to be confused with the 2.9 liter B diesel engine introduced much later). The early B engine was based on the Chevy 207 inline-6 and like the F engine, could interchange parts with its Chevy equivalent.

F (1974)

F (1974)
ManufacturerToyota
Also calledF.5 or "F and a half"
TypeInline-6
Production1974-1974
PredecessorToyota Type F engine
Successor2F
Bore90 mm
Stroke102 mm
Displacement3.9 L (3878 cc)
Fuel systemCarbureted
Fuel typeGasoline/Petrol
Oil systemSame as 2F
Cooling systemWater
Power output75/93 kW (105/125 hp)
Torque output261/289 N·m (189/209 ft·lb)
Compression ratio6.8/1

The F(1974) engine is a 3.9 liter, 75/93 kW (105/125 hp), carburated gasoline engine that is capable of 261/289 N·m (189/209 ft·lbf) of torque at 2000 RPM; the major difference between the F and the F.5 is the oiling system. The F.5 (1974) uses the same oiling set-up and configuration as its successor the 2F.

2F

2F
ManufacturerToyota
TypeInline-6
Production1975-1988
PredecessorF
Successor3F/3F-E
Bore94 mm
Stroke102 mm
Displacement4.2 L (4230 cc)
Fuel systemCarbureted
Fuel typeGasoline/Petrol
Power output100 kW (135 hp)
Torque output290 N·m (210 ft·lb)
Compression ratio7.8/1

The second version of the engine, called the 2F, was introduced in 1975. There are a few differences between the F and 2F, i.e., a larger bore in the 2F, removing one oil ring and forcing the oil to travel through the oil filter before the engine.

3F/3F-E

3F/3F-E
ManufacturerToyota
TypeInline-6
Production1988-1992
Predecessor2F
Successor1FZ-FE
Bore94 mm
Stroke95 mm
Displacement4.0 L (3955 cc)
Fuel systemFuel Injected
Fuel typeGasoline/Petrol
Power output116 kW (155 hp)
Torque output303 N·m (220 ft·lb)
Compression ratio8.1/1

The 3F-E was designed in 1985 and, in 1988, became the powerhouse for the FJ62 Land Cruiser. It is very similar to the 2F engine except that it is equipped with EFI (electronic fuel injection, carbureted in other countries), a vastly improved emissions system and a smaller displacement. The smaller displacement in the 3F-E was caused by shortening the piston stroke; this also caused the displacement to shrink from 4.2 liters to 4. However, even with this reduction, the engine power increased by 15 kW (20 hp) and 14 N·m (10 ft·lbf) of torque. As a result of these changes to the engine the redline was increased, allowing a wider powerband which made this engine far more suitable for on-road use.

In 1992, the F series engines, after almost 45 years, finally ceased production. In 1993, the F series was replaced by the dual overhead cam (DOHC) 1FZ-FE engine.

Due to the slow-revving design of these engines, it is not uncommon to see them reach over 300,000 miles (482,800 km) before needing a major overhaul.